Posts Tagged ‘concrete picture frame’

When I first placed my diploma in a concrete frame, I worried about any accelerated deterioration.  Since then, I have really tried to research the variables that will help preserve documents, art, and anything else someone may place in a concrete frame. There are a number of factors that will cause your pictures to fade, wear, or deteriorate prematurely.  I wish to discuss some of these factors and provide basic suggestions.

Humidity is the biggest threat to photos and documents.  The Library of Congress states that environments over 60% relative humidity will accelerate deterioration.  It is recommended that photos be stored at 30%-40% RH.  Less humidity is better for long-term storage, but when you consider that very low humidity can also cause skin irritation, difficulty breathing and increased static electricity, it is best to find a happy middle ground.  According to the weather channel, the appropriate range of indoor humidity is between 30%-50%.  Controlling the humidity will keep your photos, and everything else, from mildew, rot and premature decay.

Temperature also affects the lifespan of photos.  The Library of Congress suggests that around 68 degrees is best for around the house.  Colder is better, but no one wants to wear a down jacket inside.  Heat is particularly tough on color prints and causes fading and loss of photo contrast.   Again, there needs to be a balance between photo and human comfort.

Ultra-violet light will sap the life out of photos as well.  UV light will cause photos to become brittle and prone to being damaged easily.  Colors can fade and yellow in the presence of these light rays for a prolonged period of time.  To avoid this, photos can be placed out of sunlight, under safe lighting source, and behind UV filtering glass.  Any one of these remedies could keep your artwork around for future generations.

Acidic environments (pH less than 7) also cause harm to pictures.  This is what I first thought about with my concrete frame.  Concrete is inherently alkaline (pH greater than 7).  That is why it can protect embedded bare steel from rusting for centuries.  This acid-free characteristic makes concrete ideal for storing or displaying photos.

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Picture Frames

Side Tables

Coffee Tables

4″x6″ Frames

Industrial Table

Rustic Hall Table


5″x7″ Frames

Beach Table

The Pointed Hex Table

8″x10″ Frames

Trapezoidal Table

Walnut & Glass

Mirrors

Richard’s Table

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Diploma Frames

Chris & Faye’s Table

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All items are for sale unless noted on individual pages.   Many are currently listed in my Etsy store.  I welcome any custom orders or special requests.

Concrete picture frames, side tables, coffee tables and countertops have a broad range of colors and finishes.  The natural look of gray concrete appeals to some, while colorful, embedded and shiny colors appeals to others.  I have had a recent order for picture frames that have no finish and I have been reminded of how I like the simple, strong look.  I suppose that this plain look could highlight the artwork found within the frame.

On the other hand, I can’t stop trying out different ideas and colors.  A future project (not sure if it will be a frame or table or something new) will use blue rocks and colored matrix.  I want to make this project very vivid in color and be a creative piece of art.  I like the ground look which displays the rock.  My wife likes the clean, solid look.

Unfortunately, when you talk about concrete with others, they visualize old, grotesque industrial buildings.  As a structural engineer, I must boast that those buildings have probably outlasted anyone’s expectations and served their purpose well, but not many want to hang that old look on their wall or eat your popcorn from its pitted top.  In reality, concrete can be as refined as marble and as colorful as any paint selection.  I just like working with this very diverse material.

Have you ever heard of hanging pictures outside?  With concrete picture frames and concrete tables, your art can be displayed outside all year long.

I have been spending a good bit of time outside lately.  The weather is fairly nice, the bugs are not too bad and the various projects are making progress.  I was looking at one of the round concrete tables that I am working on for some friends and realized that it would go great on their patio behind their house.  This concrete is very tough and will not rot, mold, melt, rust, or be eaten by pests.  It is perfect for outdoor applications.  I  can imagine my Beach Table beside some lounge chair  at the pool.  It would work perfect in that application.   I may have to build a pool just for that reason.

Concrete picture frames or Mirrors can be waterproofed with any common sealer and be used outside all year long.  With good solid concrete, the frame will withstand any temperature, any amount of water, and it will take decades of freeze-thaw cycles before any effects are even noticeable.

I was daydreaming about some of the frames, tables, chairs and so on that I had floating in my mind.  Concrete can be anything.  Obviously work was a little slow, so my focus kind of wandered into other crazy ideas for concrete furniture.

A while back, I checked out videos about logging and how to properly fell a tree because I was about to drop a tree at my co-workers place between two houses and an array of other obstacles.  If you have a few minutes, check out the youtube video about California Redwood logging back in 1947.  I was very impressed.  National Geographic recently claimed that the Redwood forest has actually been expanding for the first time in a century – that is even more impressive.

Anyway, it got me thinking about how well concrete and wood go together.  All through my college education I was taught that concrete and steel were the match made in heaven.  I must agree, but the combination of wood and concrete can be combined in a similar way.  The wood should have a tensile strength of about 600psi and good development due to the porosity and concrete bonding.

I will have to play around some more with concrete & wood designs and look into how to dry and mill some timber.  If you have any experience or suggestions here, please let them be known.

Update:  I have really enjoyed working with wood in my furniture projects.  I have come up with a lot more ideas and only wish that I had more time and resources to make them come alive.  They will.

Hey, I am glad you found me. Frankly, I am a little surprised, but while you are here check out my concrete picture frames and concrete tables.

I sell concrete art in person, checks, paypal, Etsy, even for a barrel of sunflower seeds – whichever method you prefer.  All of my crazy creations come out of my tiny shop in Savannah Georgia and I have shipped items as far away as Hawaii.

If you would like something custom made or have ANY question about concrete furniture, feel free to contact me:

Dan Miller
concretepicture@gmail.com
912-713-5226
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